Lisa Roberts blog

2011/03/28

LESSONS and REFLECTIONS

Filed under: DrawingMovement, dance, drawing, writing — Lisa @ 06:19

Here I share lesson plans and reflections on my DRAWING MOVEMENT WORKSHOPS, acknowledge the sources of my methods and invite comments.

LESSONS and REFLECTIONS are published under a Creative Commons Share Alike license. This means that you are free to use and adapt the methods to your practice. However, in any publications, acknowledgement of this URL must be made in reference to these methods: http://lisaroberts.com.au/blog/?p=664 By acknowledging this URL you automatically acknowledge my sources.

The theory behind my practice is that physical and biological forces shape us and our environment and that drawing movement can visualise body knowledge of these forces. This is ancient knowledge that is important to recover in this time of need to reconnect.

Absolute Dance, a primal form created by Rudolf von Laban, inspires my preference for body rhythm as the catalyst for drawing.

[Laban] set out from the idea that we should be able to perceive rhythm not only through our ears; that our eyes should be just as capable of perceiving it. When we see the waves of the sea from afar, so that we cannot hear their sounds, we yet fully take in their rhythm. Why should we not have the same delight, he argued, from seeing a dancer? Why should not the dance, like a moving sculpture, be sufficient in itself? It was on these theories that he based the Absolute Dance (Gertrud Bodenwiesser, The New Dance, pp.69-70).

***

Materials:

A5 recycled paper sheets (clipped to A5 wooden drawing boards) and clutch pencils (with large soft leads) are made available to workshop participants.

***

Enter the space

Walk through the space, aware of your breath as you consciously focus on leaving behind the physical experience of getting here (by foot, bike, car or public transport) (Ref. Christine McMillan, 2008).

What changes do you note in your breathing?

Now imaginatively enter and explore a wide white page that is bound within the 3 dimensions of this place – its length, breadth and height.

Focus on your feet connecting to the ground through the weight of your whole body.

Imagine marking the ground with inky feet, drawing a scale that ranges between extremely light and heavy.

Use other body parts to draw lines of different weight through all the dimensions of your imagined 3D page.

Think of your lines as drawing the 4th dimension of time.

Gradually find stillness. Close your eyes. Breathe. Imagine yourself now within a new clear space. You have moved through the imagined white page and into the reality of the present. Open your eyes.

Take your drawing board and pencil and, without looking at the paper, slowing walk and draw a line that spirals clockwise from the centre. Allow the weight of your pencil on the paper to trace the weight of your body on the ground. Your lines will reflect this experience of movement.

2011/03/25

Bioengineered Meat

Filed under: Researchers, Science — Lisa @ 14:40

Artist James King says

I am a speculative designer working in the fields of biotechnology and interaction design. I design applications for emerging technologies and through this work examine their social and aesthetic implications.

On Mar 23, 2011 11:57 AM, he is published in the Scientific American:

If you take a small sample of animal tissue and encourage it to grow in vitro, separate from the original animal’s body, it is possible to create an edible piece of meat.

Bioengineering our brains

Filed under: Human rights, Iconography, Presentations, Science — Lisa @ 14:17

Ted Talk: American Journal of Bioethics, Neuroscience Editor, Paul Root Wolpe, says it’s time to question the bioengineering of animals, our brains and more.

I found this presentation frustratingly manipulating, but am pleased that I saw it. It brought my attention to the reality of genetic engineering. As I watched I found myself asking how genetic engineering works, but my desire for this knowledge battled with my own Nnormalcy Bias*, triggered by the continuous stream of cute animals. I wanted a more objective, balanced point of view. I wanted to see positive examples (if there are any) of positive of genetic engineering.

In order to make ethical decisions about how to regulate our behaviour, ways need to be found to communicate accurate information that do not trigger the Normalcy Bias. We face the same challenge when communicating climate change information. Because we each participate in shaping ourselves and our environment, it makes sense that we work together to decide what is good and what is bad.

*Wikipedia explains that:
The normalcy bias refers to a mental state people enter when facing a disaster. It causes people to underestimate both the possibility of a disaster occurring and its possible effects. This often results in situations where people fail to adequately prepare for a disaster, and on a larger scale, the failure of the government to include the populace in its disaster preparations. The assumption that is made in the case of the normalcy bias is that since a disaster never has occurred that it never will occur. It also results in the inability of people to cope with a disaster once it occurs. People with a normalcy bias have difficulties reacting to something they have not experienced before. People also tend to interpret warnings in the most optimistic way possible, seizing on any ambiguities to infer a less serious situation.[1]

2011/03/24

Good circulation is essential for Well Being

Filed under: Conferences — Lisa @ 08:10

Message from Chris Freemantle:

Date: Wed, 23 Mar 2011 08:44:28 +0000
From: Chris Fremantle
To: YASMIN ANNOUNCEMENTS
Subject: [Yasmin_an] Fwd: Call for Papers: Shorelines: A one day
international symposium exploring place, creativity and wellbeing

Dear all

Please circulate through your networks. We’re delighted to announce
that distinguished psychiatrist/writer/neuroscientist Iain McGilchrist
(author of The Master and his Emissary: the divided brain and the
making of the modern world) and internationally renowned land artist
Chris Drury will be keynote speakers at this symposium.

*****

Shorelines: A one day international symposium exploring place,
creativity and wellbeing Date : Tuesday 15th November 2011

Organisers : School of Creative and Cultural Industries, University of
the West of Scotland in conjunction with University of Wales Institute
Cardiff and South Ayrshire Council Museums and Galleries

Venue : The Maclaurin Galleries, Ayr, Scotland

Keynote Speakers:
Iain McGilchrist, Psychiatrist, writer, author of The Master and His
Emissary: the Divided Brain and the Making of the Modern World Chris
Drury, Land Artist

FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS
Shorelines: place, creativity and wellbeing

This one day academic symposium, to be held at the Maclaurin Galleries,
Ayr, Scotland, will explore interconnections between creative spaces or
locations and physical and emotional wellbeing. It will seek to bring
together a multidisciplinary audience of researchers, academics and
arts practitioners to present cutting edge research in their fields, to
foster discussion and further understanding about the significance of
place in the creative process and its potential to enhance the quality
of human experience.

Academic paper and visual presentations are invited to address the
themes of the symposium, which are as follows:

Place: Stimulating locations, creative spaces, geographical inspiration
Creativity: creative process in the visual arts, music, literature,
poetry and drama with focus on stimulation, inspiration, innovation and
cognition related to physical spaces and location
Wellbeing: physical and mental health and connections with creative
process and physical location, spaces or places.

We would welcome contributions from practitioners and researchers from
diverse disciplines including the arts, architecture, psychology,
health, environmental aesthetics, philosophy and education.

SUBMISSION DETAILS
Contributions to the symposium may be made in the form of academic
papers and/or illustrated presentations.

We are now inviting the submission of abstracts in response to the
above themes. Abstracts of 300 words max.

Submissions which do not address at least one of the symposium themes
will not be considered.

Authors of selected abstracts will be invited to submit full papers of
3,000 words max for peer review. Papers selected for presentation at
the symposium will be published online.

Abstracts should be copied and pasted into the body of the email,
marked as ‘Shorelines abstract’ in the subject header and sent to: Dr.
Cathy Treadaway ctreadaway@uwic.ac.uk

IMPORTANT DATES
4th March 2011 Submission of abstracts open
21st April 2011 Submission of abstracts ends
30 April 2011 Notification of acceptance of abstracts
12th August 2011 Submission of full papers for peer review
30th September 2011 Confirmation of acceptance of papers following peer
review

Contacts
Elizabeth Kwasnik Elizabeth.Kwasnik@south-ayrshire.gov.uk Tel: (01292)
445447 Anne Bontke Ann.Bontke@south-ayrshire.gov.uk Tel: (01292) 445447

Earthquake

Filed under: Datavisualization, animation, music — Lisa @ 08:02

2011/03/22

Body Narratives

Filed under: Science, drawing — Lisa @ 20:40
Ocean-bottom krill sex

Ocean-bottom krill sex

Today I discover Chris Freemantle, his reference to Krill Sex animation in EcoArtScotLand.net, and the Art $ Science Collaborations Inc. (ASCI), founded and directed by Cynthia Pannucci.

2011/03/21

Normalcy bias

Filed under: Literature, Researchers — Lisa @ 13:42

Normalcy bias

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normalcy_bias

The normalcy bias refers to a mental state people enter when facing a disaster. It causes people to underestimate both the possibility of a disaster occurring and its possible effects. This often results in situations where people fail to adequately prepare for a disaster, and on a larger scale, the failure of the government to include the populace in its disaster preparations. The assumption that is made in the case of the normalcy bias is that since a disaster never has occurred that it never will occur. It also results in the inability of people to cope with a disaster once it occurs. People with a normalcy bias have difficulties reacting to something they have not experienced before. People also tend to interpret warnings in the most optimistic way possible, seizing on any ambiguities to infer a less serious situation.[1]

The Elements of Music: Melody, Rhythm and Harmony

Filed under: music — Lisa @ 13:27

Jason Martineau, 2008. P.1:

Music is the art medium that communicates interiority, being only perceived by the ears, and received by the mind. A strict approach to understanding music with consequently always have something lacking as music theory, in essense, is primarily descriptive and not prescriptive. The tendancies and parctices in music are only observed and catalogued upn analysis, after the fact. It is the hearts and minds of human beings that shape and weave melodies, harmonies, and rhythms together into meaningful tapastries, imbued with interior landscapes of their immediate experience.

2011/03/15

New

Filed under: Iconography, dance, drawing — Lisa @ 10:09

New drawings are inspired by Barbara Cuckson, director of the Rozelle School of Visual Arts in Sydney. Barbara’s training was with the legendary Gertrud Bodenwiesser, who was in turn a student of Rudolf Laban.

In Barbara’s classes I learn to dance with primal forms that were used to develop The New Dance.

2011/03/10

Laban’s movement scales

Filed under: Literature — Lisa @ 20:11

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